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How F5Bot Slurps All of Reddit

In this guest post, Lewis Van Winkle talks about F5Bot, a free service that emails you when selected keywords are mentioned on Reddit, Hacker News, or Lobsters. He explains in detail how F5Bot is able to process millions of comments and posts from Reddit every day on a single VPS. You can check out more of Lewis Van Winkle’s writing at codeplea.com, and his open source contributions at github.com/codeplea.

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No API Is the Best API — The elegant power of Power Assert

One of the core ideas behind Facebook’s React library is that there should be no need to learn a new API for things that you already know how to do in vanilla JavaScript. Why bother memorizing Angular’s ng-repeat syntax when you can just use good-old Array.map()? That’s a good idea, and it’s a big part of what made the project so appealing to developers in the first place. So then why should Jest–the same company’s JavaScript testing framework, and a popular choice among React developers–encourage you to learn a new assertion API, and to write code like

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Recreating Python's Slice Syntax in JavaScript Using ES6 Proxies

I’ve noticed that JavaScript proxies seem to have been getting an increasing amount of attention recently. They were introduced by ECMAScript 2015 (ES6) several years ago, but they remain one of the less well-known features of the language. That’s a real shame because proxies are pretty awesome. They give you a level of flexibility that simply didn’t exist previously in JavaScript, and have allowed for projects like Remote Browser to become possible.

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A Slack Community for Developers to Discuss Web Scraping

The Web Scrapers Slack Community Want to link up with other developers interested in web scraping? Join the Web Scrapers Slack Channel to chat about Selenium, Puppeteer, Scrapy, or anything else related to web scraping. Invite Me! The last few years have been a very exciting time for web scraping. In that period, both Chrome and Firefox have introduced memory efficient headless modes which allow them to run on Linux servers without requiring X11 and a virtual framebuffer like xvfb.

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Building a YouTube MP3 Downloader with Exodus, FFmpeg, and AWS Lambda

Let’s focus on the easy part first: what we’ll be building in this tutorial. The end result will be a browser bookmarklet which can be used to convert YouTube videos to MP3s and download them. The basic interaction flow is that you click on the bookmarklet while on the page for a specific video, a new tab opens and displays a progress bar for the conversion, and then the download starts automatically as soon as it’s ready.

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Running FFmpeg on AWS Lambda for 1.9% the cost of AWS Elastic Transcoder

Building a Media Transcoder with Exodus, FFmpeg, and AWS Lambda When delivering media content over the internet, it’s important to keep in mind that factors like network bandwidth, screen resolution, and codec support will vary drastically between different devices and connections. Certain media encodings will be better suited for certain viewers, and transcoding source media to multiple formats is a must in order to ensure that you’re delivering the best possible experience to your users.

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Using Ant Design in Sass-Styled Projects

I recently started using Ant Design as my go-to React component library over ported frameworks like React-Bootstrap or React Material UI. There’s a lot to love about Ant Design: it follows a collection of well thought out design principles, has a comprehensive component library, and can easily be customized through a simple theming system. It also uses Less as its styling language, which is unfortunate if you want to transition an existing Sass-based project to Ant Design, or if you simply prefer using Sass to style your components.

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What's New in Exodus 2.0

Exodus started with one simple goal in mind: to make it as easy as possible for a user to relocate working binaries from one Linux machine to another. For example, say that your laptop has a more recent version of gzip than what’s available though your server’s package manager, but that you really want to use a command-line flag that the older version doesn’t support. exodus gzip | ssh intoli.

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Extending CircleCI's API with a Custom Microservice on AWS Lambda

There’s a lot to love about CircleCI. First of all, continuous integration is just awesome in general. You can certainly develop fine software without it, but a good CI configuration can really make your life easier. Beyond that, CircleCI has a generous free tier, provides four free containers per open source project, allows the use of custom Docker images, and is reasonably easy to configure. There’s unfortunately also some stuff not to love about CircleCI.

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It is *not* possible to detect and block Chrome headless

A few months back, I wrote a popular article called Making Chrome Headless Undetectable in response to one called Detecting Chrome Headless by Antione Vastel. The one thing that I was really trying to get across in writing that is that blocking site visitors based on browser fingerprinting is an extremely user-hostile practice. There are simply so many variations in browser configurations that you’re inevitably going to end up blocking non-automated access to your website, and–on top of that–you’re really not accomplishing anything in terms of blocking sophisticated web scrapers.

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