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Markov's and Chebyshev's Inequalities Explained

Confidence Values If you’ve ever learned any basic statistics or probability then you’ve probably encountered the 68-95-99.7 rule at some point. This rule is simply the statement that, for a normally distributed variable, roughly 68% of values will fall within one standard deviation of the mean, 95% of values within two standard deviations, and 99.7% within three standard deviations. These confidence values are quite useful to memorize because values that are computed from data are often approximately normally distributed due to the central limit theorem.

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Patching a Linux Kernel Module

A Bug on Linux? Why, I never! I’ve been using GNU/Linux for about fifteen years and, I’ve got to admit, it used to be pretty rough around the edges (to put it lightly). A lot can change over fifteen years though; most of the things that were once major problem areas haven’t required a second thought in years. Laptop suspension, WIFI, advanced function keys, sound, and pretty much everything else all typically “just work” these days, and this has been the case for quite a while.

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Understanding Neural Network Weight Initialization

Choosing Weights: Small Changes, Big Differences There are a number of important, and sometimes subtle, choices that need to be made when building and training a neural network. You have to decide which loss function to use, how many layers to have, what stride and kernel size to use for each convolution layer, which optimization algorithm is best suited for the network, etc. With so many things that need to be decided, the choice of initial weights may, at first glance, seem like just another relatively minor pre-training detail, but weight initialization can actually have a profound impact on both the convergence rate and final quality of a network.

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Intoli Joins the NVIDIA Inception Program

Intoli is Joining the NVIDIA Family We’re very pleased to announce today that Intoli will officially be joining the NVIDIA Inception Program for exceptional technology startups who are revolutionizing their industries with advances in artificial intelligence (AI) and data science. NVIDIA has been instrumental in the resurgence of neural networks in machine learning over the last several years. The rise of GPU-accelerated neural network training has allowed for major advances in the field of deep learning and NVIDIA’s GPU lines, Deep Learning SDK, and investment in AI startups have all undoubtedly played an immense role in that.

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Running Selenium with Headless Firefox

Update: This article is regularly updated in order to accurately reflect improvements in Firefox’s headless browsing capabilities. Note: Check out Running Selenium with Healdess Chrome if you’d rather use Google’s browser. Using Selenium with Headless Firefox (on Windows) Ever since Chrome implemented headless browsing support back in April, the other major browsers started following suit. In particular, Mozilla has since then expanded support for Firefox’s headless mode from Linux to its Windows and macOS builds, and fixed a number of bugs that might have been in the way of early adopters.

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Finding Pareto Optimal Blogs on Hacker News

Introduction I’ve been doing a lot of technical writing recently and, with that experience, I’ve grown to more deeply appreciate the writing of others. It’s easy to take the effort behind an article for granted when you’ve grown accustomed to there being new high-quality content posted every day on Hacker News and Twitter. The truth is that a really good article can take days or more to put together and it isn’t easy to write even one article that really takes off, let alone a steady stream of them.

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Why I still don't use Yarn

But Isn’t Yarn the Best Node Package Manager? If you’re only comparing it to npm, then the answer is unequivocally yes. Yarn is generally much faster than npm and gives you deterministic builds by default, built-in integrity checking, license management tools, and a host of other goodies. Despite all of that, I still usually don’t use yarn. I avoid yarn for one simple reason: disk space usage. I feel like a bit of a curmudgeon here, but I find it a little absurd that it can easily take 100 MB, or more, to store a project consisting of a couple hundred lines of JavaScript if you want to use modern tooling (e.

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The tech videos that have most impacted me as a developer

Introduction Over the years, I’ve collected a handful of videos that I deeply enjoy and that have had a significant impact on me as a developer. These are videos that I love introducing people to and I’m happy to have the chance to share them with you here. I find them all inspirational in their own ways and they serve as a continuous reminder for me to keep an open mind and to take creative approaches to problems.

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Predicting Hacker News article success with neural networks and TensorFlow

Hacker News Title Tool Enter a potential title for a Hacker News submission below to see how likely it is to succeed or to be flagged dead. Once you play around a bit you can read on to learn how exactly these predictions are made. Background Submitting an article to Hacker News can be a little stressful if you’ve invested a lot of time in writing it. An article’s success really hinges upon getting the initial four or five votes that will push it on to the front page where it can reach a broader audience.

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Email Spy: A new open source browser extension for lead generation

Introduction Lead generation is a top priority for most successful companies and helping businesses find potential clients is a big part of what we do here at Intoli. Today, we’re pleased to announce a new open source marketing tool that makes it possible to find contact emails for any web domain with a single click. It’s called Email Spy and you can get the source on GitHub or install it directly as a Chrome extension or a Firefox addon.

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