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Running Selenium with Headless Chrome

UPDATE: This article is updated regularly to reflect the latest information and versions. If you’re looking for instructions then skip ahead to see Setup Instructions. NOTE: Be sure to check out Running Selenium with Headless Chrome in Ruby if you’re interested in using Selenium in Ruby instead of Python. Background It has long been rumored that Google uses a headless variant of Chrome for their web crawls. Over the last two years or so it had started looking more and more like this functionality would eventually make it into the public releases and, as of this week, that has finally happened.

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Terminal Recorders: A Comprehensive Guide

Recording a terminal session and converting into a nice animated GIF to embed on a website. Sounds pretty simple, right? I’ve occasionally wanted to embed terminal recorders into blog posts, but it wasn’t until recently that I decided to actually look into some of the tools available to do it. It turns out that there are a lot of them. That alone isn’t necessarily a bad thing, but it also unfortunately turns out that most of them have some pretty serious issues.

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Fantasy Football for Hackers II — An Interactive Visualization of Average Draft Position vs Season Projections

ADP vs Season Projections In the first part of this series, Fantasy Football for Hackers I, I walked through the process of coming up with my own draft strategy using scraped projections and simulated rosters. A lot of people pointed out that I probably would have done better if I had just looked up the average draft positions and picked the best available players. As one user on /r/fantasyfootball so eloquently put it:

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Running Selenium with Headless Chrome in Ruby

NOTE: Be sure to check out Running Selenium with Headless Chrome if you’re interested in using Selenium in Python instead of Ruby. Since Google added support to run Chrome and Chromium in headless mode as of version 59, it has become a popular choice for both testing and web scraping. There are a few Chrome-specific automation solutions out there, such as Puppeteer and Chrome Remote Interface, but Selenium remains a popular choice due to it’s uniform API across web browsers and it’s support for multiple programming languages.

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