Headless

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It is *not* possible to detect and block Chrome headless

A few months back, I wrote a popular article called Making Chrome Headless Undetectable in response to one called Detecting Chrome Headless by Antione Vastel. The one thing that I was really trying to get across in writing that is that blocking site visitors based on browser fingerprinting is an extremely user-hostile practice. There are simply so many variations in browser configurations that you’re inevitably going to end up blocking non-automated access to your website, and–on top of that–you’re really not accomplishing anything in terms of blocking sophisticated web scrapers.

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Saving Images from a Headless Browser

In this post, I will highlight a few ways to save images while scraping the web through a headless browser. The simplest solution would be to extract the image URLs from the headless browser and then download them separately, but what if that’s not possible? Perhaps the images you need are generated dynamically or you’re visiting a website which only serves images to logged-in users. Maybe you just don’t want to put unnecessary strain on their servers by requesting the image multiple times.

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Making Chrome Headless Undetectable

Detecting Headles Chrome A short article titled Detecting Chrome Headless popped up on Hacker News over the weekend and it has since been making the rounds. Most of the discussion on Hacker News was focused around the author’s somewhat dubious assertion that web scraping is a “malicious task” that belongs in the same category as advertising fraud and hacking websites. That’s always a fun debate to get into, but the thing that I really took issue with about the article was that it implicitly promoted the idea of blocking users based on browser fingerprinting.

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Running Selenium with Headless Firefox

Update: This article is regularly updated in order to accurately reflect improvements in Firefox’s headless browsing capabilities. Note: Check out Running Selenium with Healdess Chrome if you’d rather use Google’s browser. Using Selenium with Headless Firefox (on Windows) Ever since Chrome implemented headless browsing support back in April, the other major browsers started following suit. In particular, Mozilla has since then expanded support for Firefox’s headless mode from Linux to its Windows and macOS builds, and fixed a number of bugs that might have been in the way of early adopters.

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Running Selenium with Headless Chrome

UPDATE: This article is updated regularly to reflect the latest information and versions. If you’re looking for instructions then skip ahead to see Setup Instructions. NOTE: Be sure to check out Running Selenium with Headless Chrome in Ruby if you’re interested in using Selenium in Ruby instead of Python. Background It has long been rumored that Google uses a headless variant of Chrome for their web crawls. Over the last two years or so it had started looking more and more like this functionality would eventually make it into the public releases and, as of this week, that has finally happened.

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Using Puppeteer to Scrape Websites with Infinite Scrolling

Infinite scrolling has become a ubiquitous design pattern on the web. Social media sites like Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram all feature infinitely scrolling feeds to keep users engaged with an essentially unbounded amount of content. Here’s what that looks like on Instagram, for example. This mechanism is typically implemented by using JavaScript to detect when the user has scrolled far enough down the existing feed, and then querying an underlying API endpoint for the next batch of data that gets processed and dynamically injected into the page.

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Running Selenium with Headless Chrome in Ruby

NOTE: Be sure to check out Running Selenium with Headless Chrome if you’re interested in using Selenium in Python instead of Ruby. Since Google added support to run Chrome and Chromium in headless mode as of version 59, it has become a popular choice for both testing and web scraping. There are a few Chrome-specific automation solutions out there, such as Puppeteer and Chrome Remote Interface, but Selenium remains a popular choice due to it’s uniform API across web browsers and it’s support for multiple programming languages.

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