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JavaScript Injection with Selenium, Puppeteer, and Marionette in Chrome and Firefox

Browser automation frameworks–like Puppeteer, Selenium, Marionette, and Nightmare.js–strive to provide rich APIs for configuring and interacting with web browsers. These generally work quite well, but you’re inevitably going to end up running into API limitations if you do a lot of testing or web scraping. You might find yourself wanting to conceal the fact that you’re using a headless browser, extract image resources from a web page, set the seed for Math.

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Making Chrome Headless Undetectable

Detecting Headles Chrome A short article titled Detecting Chrome Headless popped up on Hacker News over the weekend and it has since been making the rounds. Most of the discussion on Hacker News was focused around the author’s somewhat dubious assertion that web scraping is a “malicious task” that belongs in the same category as advertising fraud and hacking websites. That’s always a fun debate to get into, but the thing that I really took issue with about the article was that it implicitly promoted the idea of blocking users based on browser fingerprinting.

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Running Selenium with Headless Firefox

Update: This article is regularly updated in order to accurately reflect improvements in Firefox’s headless browsing capabilities. Note: Check out Running Selenium with Healdess Chrome if you’d rather use Google’s browser. Using Selenium with Headless Firefox (on Windows) Ever since Chrome implemented headless browsing support back in April, the other major browsers started following suit. In particular, Mozilla has since then expanded support for Firefox’s headless mode from Linux to its Windows and macOS builds, and fixed a number of bugs that might have been in the way of early adopters.

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Running Selenium with Headless Chrome

UPDATE: This article is updated regularly to reflect the latest information and versions. If you’re looking for instructions then skip ahead to see Setup Instructions. NOTE: Be sure to check out Running Selenium with Headless Chrome in Ruby if you’re interested in using Selenium in Ruby instead of Python. Background It has long been rumored that Google uses a headless variant of Chrome for their web crawls. Over the last two years or so it had started looking more and more like this functionality would eventually make it into the public releases and, as of this week, that has finally happened.

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Using Firefox WebExtensions with Selenium

The WebExtensions API In 2015, Mozilla announced that they would be deprecating XPCOM and XUL based addons in favor of their new WebExtensions API based on the Google Chrome Extension API. There were some vocal critics of this shift because it meant that some existing add-ons would be discontinued, but this was tremendously positive news for add-on and extension developers. Writing cross-browser extensions had previously been an absolutely miserable experience, and many developers understandably chose to only target Chrome due to its market share and relatively pleasant API.

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Using Google Chrome Extensions with Selenium

Running Google Chrome with an extension installed is quite simple because Chrome supports a --load-extension command-line argument for exactly this purpose. This can be specified before launching Chrome with Selenium by creating a ChromeOptions instance and calling add_argument(). from selenium import webdriver from selenium.common.exceptions import NoSuchElementException # Configure the necessary command-line option. options = webdriver.ChromeOptions() options.add_argument('--load-extension=path/to/the/extension') # Initalize the driver with the appropriate options. driver = webdriver.Chrome(chrome_options=options) The above code will setup a Selenium driver for Chrome with the extension located at path/to/extension preinstalled.

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Running Selenium with Headless Chrome in Ruby

NOTE: Be sure to check out Running Selenium with Headless Chrome if you’re interested in using Selenium in Python instead of Ruby. Since Google added support to run Chrome and Chromium in headless mode as of version 59, it has become a popular choice for both testing and web scraping. There are a few Chrome-specific automation solutions out there, such as Puppeteer and Chrome Remote Interface, but Selenium remains a popular choice due to it’s uniform API across web browsers and it’s support for multiple programming languages.

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How to Clear the Firefox Browser Cache With Selenium WebDriver/geckodriver

If you use Selenium for automated testing or web scraping, you may have discovered that there is no built-in utility for clearing browser resources like cookies, cached scripts, and objects in local storage. This is not particularly surprising given that the WebDriver specification that Selenium uses behind the scenes has no provision for clearing the cache. However, lingering cached resources can cause your tests to pass when they shouldn’t, prevent your scrapers from quickly starting clean sessions on demand, and cause all sorts of undesirable behavior besides.

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How to Clear the Chrome Browser Cache With Selenium WebDriver/ChromeDriver

Sometimes during the course of testing or web scraping with Google Chrome, you might desire to clear the browser cache and cookies with Selenium. You can of course call driver.close() on your current ChromeDriver instance and then provision a new one. The fresh instance of Chrome will start with a clean browser history, cookies, and cache. There are however times when this method loses other state that you may want to preserve.

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